2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel to deliver 46 mpg on highway

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel - 003The Cruze diesel will be GM’s first diesel car sold in the United States since the 1980s.

As reported in Autoweek this month, General Motors said the 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel will deliver an estimated 46 miles per gallon on the highway.  This is 4 mpg more than the original target.

The estimate is also good enough to top a rival the 2013 Volkswagen Jetta diesel, which achieves 42 mpg on the highway.

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel - 004The Cruze’s 2-liter turbo diesel engine produces 148 horsepower. The Cruze diesel, featuring a six-speed automatic transmission, has an estimated range of 700 highway miles. It emits 90 percent less nitrogen oxide and particulate emissions than earlier diesel models, according to GM.

“We were still testing at the time, but wanted to be clear that we would be at or better than Jetta,” a GM spokeswoman said. “The engineering team did a lot of incremental changes to the Cruze diesel from the Eco model to gain efficiency.”

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel - 002The Washington Post suggests, “The 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel will be something of a highway star when it goes on sale, with an EPA-estimated rating of 46 mpg highway.”

The engine also has an overboost feature capable of increasing torque to an estimated 280 lb-ft for short bursts of faster acceleration when needed, such as entering fast-moving highway traffic.

Chris Perry, Chevrolet vice president of marketing, “Cruze Clean Turbo Diesel fills an important role in Chevrolet’s diverse four-cylinder lineup, and is primed to win over diesel devotees and compact car buyers with its performance, torque and fuel economy. We leveraged engineering expertise from around the globe to develop a world-class, low-emissions engine to give U.S. and Canadian customers a car that’s both fun to drive and practical at the pump.”

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel - 001

Bob Bell Chevrolet of Bel Air
1230 Belair Road
Bel Air, MD 21014
(888) 844-0314

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Get Better Fuel Economy

 

You’d be surprised at how much you can really save by doing the smallest of things.

The list of these things goes on and on, with some tips actually being myths. It all depends on the credibility of the source. Recently, ConsumerReports.org provided some tips that wanted to share.

  • Choices. If you have a smart phone, there is an array of applications you can download that will tell you the prices of nearby gas stations. One of the best ones by far is GasBuddy. It’s free and easy. When it’s time for a fill-up, there’s no reason in the world you shouldn’t spare the single minute it takes to find your options.
  • Pass on premium gas. If your car is designed to run on regular gasoline, as most vehicles are, don’t waste your money on premium unless it’s “required”. It won’t make your engine run any better, and the only real difference you’re likely to see is about 20 cents more per gallon. To find out if your car needs top-grade gas, check the owner’s manual, or fuel-filler door. If premium is “recommended,” then it is optional. Peak, at-the-limit performance may decrease, but it is not likely to be noticeable to the typical driver.
  • Reduce drag. Don’t add to your car’s aerodynamic drag by carrying things on top of the roof or hanging off the back of your vehicle if you don’t have to. When ConsumerReports installed a large car-top carrier on a Toyota Camry, gas mileage dropped by a notable 6 mpg when we drove at 65 mph. Ski season is over; take off the unused rack. And even though kayak season is in full swing, remove the carrier when not in use.
  • Tire inflation. This one has been said time and time again and in ConsumerReports’ tests, they found that fuel economy is reduced when tires are not inflated to where they should be. Check your tires’ pressure and top off as needed when they’re cold (before the vehicle has been driven or after no more than a couple of miles of driving). Use the inflation pressure recommended by the vehicle’s manufacturer, not the maximum pressure embossed on the tire’s sidewall. The recommended pressure is usually found on a placard on a front door jamb, in the glove compartment, or in the owner’s manual.
  • Check your route. With GPS systems, it is now even easier to track traffic and choose alternative routes, but keep in mind that traveling at a consistent speed without many stops or traffic lights is best for fuel economy. Some GPS devices, including recent Garmins, have an “Eco” function to factor fuel consumption into its route plans.
  • No idling. There is no need to warm up your car or keep it running while waiting for passengers. The general rule-of-thumb is to turn off your car if you know you’ll be stopped for more than 30 seconds. Don’t worry about the starter, it is designed for multiple, repeated starts.


Give these fuel saving tips a try, every little bit helps.

Bob Bell Chevrolet of Bel Air
1230 Belair Road
Bel Air, MD 21014
(888) 844-0314

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