Tire Maintenance 101

 

 

Where the rubber meets the road is more than just a commonly used expression – it is where the safety and performance of your Chevrolet vehicle begins. We usually become proactive in tire maintenance as the season changes.  And the season will change sooner than we probably expect.  Here is some ‘tire talk’ for you to prepare for that moment of ‘change’.

How long do tires last?

40 years ago, the average life expectancy of a tire was not more than 2 years!  Today it is best to change your tires after every 6 years at least.  After tires hit a life span of 6 years, they should be discarded. This is because rubber loses its elasticity and resistance properties over that period.  Ultimately, the life expectancy of a tire greatly depends on its maintenance, environmental conditions and the driving style of the driver.

Factor Affecting the Life of Tires

  • Climatic Conditions – If you stay near the beach or if it rains a lot in your area, the chances are the moisture in the air will ruin the rubber faster.
  • Road Conditions – A bumpy ride can also reduce your tire’s life
  • Exposure to Sun – Simply put, the more the exposure to the sun, the sooner the tire ages.
  • Other Factors – Avoid exceeding the total limit of weight allowed for your tires to carry.
  • Quality of Maintenance – How long you can use tires depends a lot on how you took care of it in the first place. When the tires are neglected or the wheel alignment is not correct, it will accelerate the aging process.

How to Extend Your Tire’s Life

Tire life can be increased by taking a few simple steps which will help protect them from premature rotting:

  • Check your tires for proper inflation pressures on a monthly basis. Buy and use a good digital tire gauge even though your tires may be equipped with tire pressure monitors. Do not use the maximum pounds per square inch (PSI) noted on the tire’s sidewall as the measure for proper inflation; the recommended PSI for your vehicle’s tires is located on the driver’s side door jamb or in the owner’s manual for your car. Under or over-inflation of your tires inhibits the effectiveness of stabilizing additives found in most tires.
  • Park your car in a garage or carport to decrease the tires’ exposure to the elements.  Protection from excessive heat and UV rays will help protect your tires from premature rot.
  • Apply a tire conditioner that is formulated to protect tires from UV rays and/or ozone. Household cleansers and petrochemical or silicone containing tire cleaning products can actually remove much of the tire’s protective waxes.
  • Drive the car regularly and at moderate speeds. Car tires that sit, unmoving, for long periods of time do not flex. Therefore, the stabilizing additives do not distribute as designed.
  • Buy new tires that were manufactured no more than two years prior. Dates are located on one side of each tire, and use numbers that coincide with week and year of manufacture. For example, 1209 means it was made in the twelfth week of 2009. Ask for tires that have UV stabilizers and ozone shielding additives.

  • Outside edges: tires that are worn on the outside edges have been under inflated.
  • Center of tire: tires that are worn in the center have been over inflated.
  • One of the edges: when the tire is worn on one side but not the other the camber angle is off either negative or positive. (Positive camber: is when the top of the tire leans away from the vehicle. Negative camber is when the top of the tire leans in towards the vehicle. This can also be caused by bent or damaged front end parts: tie rods, ball joints, etc.)
  • Tire is feathered: when the tire is feathered across the tread the tie rods are worn or the vehicle needs to be aligned.
  • Tire is scalloped: when the tire is scalloped or cupped across the tread it is usually caused by bad shocks or struts. This can also be caused by out of balance tires.

Rotate Your Tires

When tire rotation is done at the recommended times, it can preserve balanced handling and traction and even out tire wear. Tire rotation can even provide performance advantages.

Many tire mileage warranties require tire rotation to keep the warranty valid. When should tires be rotated? We recommend that tires be rotated every 6,000 to 10,000Km even if they don’t show signs of wear.  Consider tire rotation with oil change intervals while the vehicle is off the ground.

Tire rotation helps even out tire wear by allowing each tire to serve in as many of the vehicle’s wheel positions as possible. Remember, tire rotation can’t correct wear problems due to worn mechanical parts or incorrect inflation pressures.

If you maintain your tires, observe the wear on your tires, rotate your tires and recognize a tire has a life of it’s own, you will maximize it. If you need new tires, try our ‘Tire Finder‘ tool.  Search by year, make, model and tire size and we will show you quality new tires that fit your vehicle.

Bob Bell Chevrolet of Bel Air
1230 Belair Road
Bel Air, MD 21014
(888) 844-0314

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A Guinness World Record of Chevrolet Memorabilia

 

Of the hundreds of thousands of automotive enthusiasts around the world who worship at the altar of the sports car, very few can claim ownership of 2,014 Chevrolet Corvettes.

That’s 2,013 in Charles Mallon’s basement—contained in a display case and dozens of tote bags—and one in his garage: a 2005 LeMans blue C6.

One real Corvette is just enough for Charles Mallon.

Turning a hobby into a quest for a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records isn’t something one plans overnight. Indeed, Mallon has accomplished just that. In June, he was certified by the Guinness folks for having the “Largest Collection of Chevrolet Memorabilia.”

He can trace back his affection for the marque to the age of 2, when, his mother tells him, he “could pick out a Corvette in a crowd, and run right over to it.”

Mallon’s Corvette-mania extends beyond just the miniature car models: He’s been assembling all bits of Chevy memorabilia since he was 14, from signs and books and posters to soda cans and Chevy belts. But his heart lies with the car.

“I started serious collection when I was 14,” he says. “I would bring home three models, then five models, and you get carried away. I’m into cars of all shapes and sizes, but growing up it was probably the look and the sound of the Corvette. It’s America’s sports car.”

Now 54 and a consultant working with auto dealerships on facility improvements, Mallon—who’s lived in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia, all his life—still enlists friends to seek out Corvette miniatures on their visits to toy stores and flea markets. About 600, ranging in size from a few centimeters to more than a foot, reside in that display case in Mallon’s basement, and the rest are packed away in tote bags, “rotated on display periodically,” he says. Mallon’s wife, Gina, is particularly good-natured about the whole thing. “That’s his man-cave downstairs,” she says. “It’s not as bad as it sounds.”

Mallon formerly belonged to a Corvette owners’ club and is just now getting back in. “I traveled a lot and my kids were quite young so I didn’t keep up with too many events,” he says, but he’s planning to attend a meeting later this summer. He’s also planning to become more involved in the Corvette social media scene a community that embraces nearly 1 million fans.

One Corvette experience he’s highly anticipating is checking out the Corvette 427 Collector Edition with available 60th Anniversary Design Package for 2013. “Should be a blast to drive… all that power in a convertible. I can’t wait to collect all the miniatures produced for that special car.”

Earlier this year Mallon assembled his entire collection on the floor of a high school gym near his home, part of the process of establishing a benchmark for a new Guinness category. He submitted a formal application—“to validate my insanity”—and was awarded the certificate in June.

Mallon says he’s interacted with collectors who own many more miniatures than he does, but no one with as many Corvettes: “I catalog all of them on an Excel spread sheet; break ’em down by exterior color, interior color, wheel color.”

Isolating a favorite for Mallon is part science, part impulse. He enjoys a couple of high-priced Franklin Mint Corvettes given to him as gifts, as well as a collection of cars with National Football League logos (“Every team but the Detroit Lions…they’re owned by Ford”).

Pick one?  “A Betty Boop Corvette limited edition.”

Thank you to Stephen Williams for this story. We liked it so much we wanted to share it with you!

Bob Bell Chevrolet of Bel Air
1230 Belair Road
Bel Air, MD 21014
(888) 844-0314

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